Winner 2016

Faszinierendes Material Carbonbeton

Carbon concrete, a fascinating material - economical, efficient, attractive

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Manfred Curbach (Spokesperson)
Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Dipl.-Wirt. Ing. Chokri Cherif
Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Peter Offermann
Technische Universität Dresden

(f.l.t.r.) Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Peter Offermann, Prof. Dr.-Ing. Manfred Curbach, Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Dipl.-Wirt. Ing. Chokri Cherif

Maintaining buildings, bridges and towers is time consuming and costly. The reason is the reinforced concrete used in many structures: the steel reinforcing bar can corrode, making the building material crack. Is it possible to replace it with a more robust alternative?

Prof. Manfred Curbach, Prof. Chokri Cherif and Prof. Peter Offermann were significantly involved in the development of one of these alternatives. They elaborated an innovative concrete-composite material that is considerably more durable than steel reinforced concrete and gives architects new design options. Instead of an iron core that is subject to corrosion, this concrete contains carbon: a fabric made of fine carbon fibres. Carbon concrete is durable, environmentally friendly and versatile in its uses. The three nominees conduct research at the Technische Universität Dresden: Manfred Curbach is head of the Institute for Solid Building Construction, Peter Offermann is Professor Emeritus at the Institute for Textile Machines and Textile High Performance Materials Science that is currently chaired by Chokri Cherif.

Reinforced concrete (RC) has been the material most frequently used in residential and industrial buildings, factories, bridges, tunnels, towers and concrete masts since the 1950's. As rebar, ribbed steel rods are placed in concrete to improve stability since it combines the compressive strength of concrete with the tensile strength of steel. Yet it has its disadvantages as well. RC manufacture uses a lot of energy and accounts for a high percentage of the construction industry's CO2 emissions. Reinforced concrete structures are also an increasing safety risk: since steel is threatened by corrosion, structures have a limited life span of around 40 to 80 years. This is one of the reasons why many of the 120,000 bridges in Germany will need maintenance work in the next few years. This goes hand-in-hand with costs totalling billions of Euros. Replacing steel-reinforced concrete with carbon concrete can largely avoid expensive repairs and also lower the use of resources.

Reinforced concrete (RC) has been the material most frequently used in residential and industrial buildings, factories, bridges, tunnels, towers and concrete masts since the 1950's. As rebar, ribbed steel rods are placed in concrete to improve stability since it combines the compressive strength of concrete with the tensile strength of steel. Yet it has its disadvantages as well. RC manufacture uses a lot of energy and accounts for a high percentage of the construction industry's CO2 emissions. Reinforced concrete structures are also an increasing safety risk: since steel is threatened by corrosion, structures have a limited life span of around 40 to 80 years. This is one of the reasons why many of the 120,000 bridges in Germany will need maintenance work in the next few years. This goes hand-in-hand with costs totalling billions of Euros. Replacing steel-reinforced concrete with carbon concrete can largely avoid expensive repairs and also lower the use of resources.

The carbon used to reinforce concrete is even stronger than steel, but at the same time much lighter and more durable since it does not corrode. Building elements made of carbon concrete can thus be thinner, reducing demand for raw materials. Energy use and CO2 emissions are cut almost in half. Very intricate structural designs are possible thanks to the flexible ductility of the carbon fibres, increasing the useful life of the structures beyond that of those made of steel reinforced concrete.

Carbon concrete can be used to maintain and save homes, bridges or masts that are at risk structurally. It has already been in use since 2006: by applying a thin layer of carbon concrete, the life span of commercial buildings, bridges, and facade elements can be extended considerably. On new structures, the smaller size and lower weight of the concrete structural elements with carbon are significant. For example, façade panels of carbon concrete are only about two centimetres thick, whereas if made of steel reinforced concrete, they would be eight centimetres thick. This reduces the cost of production, transport and installation. Since much less material is needed, the material costs of carbon are comparable to those of steel in regard to performance. Modules made of carbon concrete can also be made to serve other functions, such as in insulation, heating or for monitoring, adding built-in "intelligent networking" capabilities to buildings or bridges.

Germany heads worldwide research into the principles and applications of the revolutionary building material. An extensive project launched in 2014 is designed to further shore up and expand on this leading role. The project "C3 – Carbon Concrete Composite" with some 140 participating institutes and enterprises is financed with Euro 45m from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) as well as Euro 25m in equity capital. TU Dresden serves as the consortium leader whose chairman is Manfred Curbach. The researchers are paving the way to the market for carbon concrete and laying the foundation for its general use in the construction industry. The potential is enormous: around 160m tonnes of steel are used worldwide every year to reinforce concrete, 4m tonnes in Germany alone. The aim is to use carbon to reduce this amount by 20% over the next ten years.

The right to nominate outstanding achievements for the Deutscher Zukunftspreis is incumbent on leading German institutions in science and industry as well as foundations.

The project "Carbon concrete, a fascinating material - economical, efficient, attractive” was nominated by the Leopoldina - the German National Academy of Sciences.

Deutscher Zukunftspreis 2016 Erklärfilm ZDF Team 1

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Resumes

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Manfred Curbach

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Manfred Curbach

28.09.1956
Born in Dortmund
1963 – 1967
Dietrich-Bonhoeffer-Elementary School in Dortmund
1967 – 1976
Einstein-Grammar School in Dortmund
1976 – 1977
Military service 3./FlaRakBtl 26 in Wiesmoor
1977 – 1982
University of Dortmund, study of Civil Engineering, Structural engineering
1980
Admission to the German Academic Scholarship Foundation of the Federal Republic of Germany
1982
Study abroad at Princeton University, New Jersey, USA, Prof. Billington, with the main emphasis on “Bridge construction in the USA” and “Maillart”, as scholarship holder for the German Academic Scholarship Foundation of the Federal Republic of Germany
1982 – 1983
Research associate at the University of Dortmund, Chair for Concrete and steel reinforced concrete construction, Prof. Eibl
1984 – 1988
Research associate at the University of Karlsruhe, Institute for Concrete Structures and Material Technology, Prof. Eibl
1987
Doctorate in Civil Engineering, University of Karlsruhe, Degree: Dr.-Ing. (magna cum laude)
1988 – 1994
Project manager with Köhler + Seitz Engineers, Nürnberg / Dresden / München
1994
Lectures on Concrete Structures at the Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden)
1994 – 2004
Partner at Köhler + Seitz Engineers, Nürnberg / Dresden / München
since 1994
University professor (C4), Holder of the Chair for Concrete Structures at TU Dresden
1997
Approval as inspection engineer for structural analysis for concrete structures
since 1999
Member of the scientific advisory board for the German periodical "Beton- und Stahlbetonbau"
1999 – 2011
Spokesman of the Collaborative Research Centre 528 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG (German Research Association) "Textile Bewehrungen zur bautechnischen Verstärkung und Instandsetzung" (Textile reinforcements for structural strenghtening and repair)
2000 – 2002
Expert for the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - DFG
2002 – 2008
Member of the senate of the DFG
2003 – 2008
Chairman of the Verein Deutscher Ingenieure Gesellschaft - VDI, Fachbereich Bautechnik (Association of German Engineers - Division Civil Engineering)
2004 – 2012
Chairman of the immediate managing board of the Deutscher Ausschuss für Stahlbeton e. V. - DAfStb (German Committee for Structural Concrete)
since 2005
Partner at Curbach Bösche Ingenieurpartner, Dresden
2006 – 2010
Vice-Rector for Structure and Development
since 2010
Head of the German delegation of the International Federation for Structural Concrete fib (fédération internationale du béton)
since 2011
Spokesman of the Priority Programme SPP 1542 “Leicht Bauen mit Beton“ funded by the DFG
since 2013
Spokesman of the consortium C³ – Carbon Concrete Composite funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)
since 2014
Chairman of the scientific advisory board of the Bundesanstalt für Wasserbau (BAW) (Federal Waterways Engineering and Research Institute)

Further functionings

National delegation for the fib for Germany , until May 2008 for the previous association called European Committee for Concrete (CEB)
Convenor of the fib Task Group 1.6 History of Concrete Structures
Member of the research board of the DAfStb
Member of the committee "Design and Construction" of the DIN e.V.
Member of the research board of the University of Kaiserslautern
Convenor of the expert‘s committee „Bearing surface insulation of LAU-systems (storage, filling and handling)“ of the Deutsches Institut für Bautechnik - DIBt (Centre of Competence for Construction)
Member of ACI, ASCE, DAfStb, IngKammer, PCI, RILEM, VDI, VPI

Research emphasis

Carbon reinforced concrete
Material behaviour of concrete under high loading rates
Behaviour of concrete components under impact
Multiaxial concrete strength
Composite behaviour of high-performance concrete and reinforcement steel under fatigue load
Reinforcement and repair of old concrete constructions
Bridge construction

Honors

2003
Innovation Award of the TechTextil
2006
Award for Outstanding Concrete Structures of the fib – fédération internationale du béton
2011
Honorary doctorate of the University of Kaiserslautern
2012
Winner of the German Bridge Construction Prize in the category Road and Rail Bridges
2013
Admission to the German National Academy of Sciences Leopoldina
2014
Conferment of the Wolfgang-Zerna medal of honour by the VDI – Division Civil Engineering and Building Services
2014
GreenTec-Award
2015
National German Sustainability Award by the BMBF, category Research
2015
Deutscher Rohstoffeffizienz-Preis by the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi)
2016
Election as full member to the Technikwissenschaftlichen Klasse (Class of Engineering Sciences) of the Sächsische Akademie der Wissenschaften zu Leipzig (Saxon Academy of Sciences in Leipzig)
2016
Conferment of the George Sarton medal of honour of the History of Science Society, University of Gent

Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Dipl.-Wirt. Ing. Chokri Cherif

Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Dipl.-Wirt. Ing. Chokri Cherif

24.05.1966
Born in Bourouis, Tunisia
1986 – 1992
RWTH Aachen University, study of Mechanical Engineering, Textile Technology
1992 – 1993
Research Associate at RWTH Aachen University, Institute of General Mechanics
1992 – 1995
RWTH Aachen University, study of Business and Economics
1993 – 2001
Research Associate at RWTH Aachen University, Institute of Textile Technology
2001 – 2005
Associate professor at RTWH Aachen University, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, VENIA LEGENDI for Textile Production Technology
2002 – 2003
Coordinator technology and Head of technology development at Rieter Ingolstadt Spinnereimaschinenbau AG
2004 – 2005
Department Manager development and instruction, member of the management, Business Unit at Rieter Ingolstadt Spinnereimaschinenbau AG
since 2005
Director of the Institute of Textile Machinery and High Performance Material Technnology (ITM) at the University of Dresden
since 2009
Managing director of the TUDATEX GmbH

Further functionings (abridged version)

since 2007
Main organizer (in collaboration with the DWI and RWTH Aachen University as well as the Institut für Textil- und Verfahrenstechnik (ITV) Denkendorf) (Institute of Textile and Process Technology)) of the Aachen-Dresden-Denkendorf International Textile Conference (>700 participants)
since 2008
Mentor for the founding of new businesses
since 2009
Member of the faculty board and the Strukturkommission of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Dresden
since 2009
Review Board of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft - DFG ( German Research Association), division „Lightweight Construction, Textile Technology“
2010 – 2013
Chairman AUTEX – International Association of Universities for Textiles
2013 – 2015
Vice-chairman AUTEX - International Association of Universities for Textiles
since 2014
Founding member C³ - Carbon Concrete Composites e. V.
since 2015
Member of the university council at Hof University
since 2015
Member of the academic council of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft industrieller Forschungsvereinigungen „Otto von Guericke“ e.V. – AiF (German Federation of Industrial Research Associations) / Chairman expert’s group 5
since 2016
Founding member of the „Research Center Carbon Fibers Saxony (RCCF)”

Publications and patents

1.500 national and international publications in periodicals as well as written lectures in reference books and research journals
230 national und international patents
5 reference books

Honours

Since 2005 more than 60 prizes have been awarded to outstanding student research projects, dissertations and scientific projects which have been supervised by the ITM:
2010
„Théophile Legrand International Award for Textile Innovation” 2010(in Roubaix/FR and 2016 in Paris/FR
2011
Paul Schlack Award 2011
2013
Max-Kehren-medal of honour 2013
2014
AVK-Innovation-Award Research/Science 2014
2014
mtex-Innovation-Award 2014
2014
Paul Schlack Award 2014
2015
Otto von Guericke-Award 2015
2015
JEC Innovation Award Europe 2015

Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Peter Offermann

Prof. Dr.-Ing. habil. Peter Offermann

13.07.1940
Born in Görlitz
1958
Grammar school in Zittau
1958 – 1964
Mechanical Engineering, College of Technology Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden respectively, textile technology
1964 – 1968
Research associate at the Technische Universität Dresden (TU Dresden), Institute of Textile Technology
1968
Doctorate: Mechanical Engineering in 1968, TU Dresden, Degree: Dr.-Ing. (magna cum laude)
1975
Habilitation: Mechanical Engineering, TU Dresden
1968 – 1969
Head of the main research and development center at VEB Tüllgardinen- und Spitzenwerke Dresden
1969 – 1974
Vice director for research and development at VEB Textilkombinat Cottbus
1970
Appointment to honorary lecturer für textile technology at TU Dresden
1974
Appointment to assistant professor for textile technology at TU Dresden
1977 – 1990
Vice research division manager of the division Textile and Ready-Made Technology, TU Dresden
1984
Appointment to university professor
1990 – 1997
Vice-Rector for structure and development of the TU Dresden, 1st deputy of the Rector
1990 – 2005
Director of the Institute of Textile and Ready-Made Technology at TU Dresden (now known as Institute of Textile Machinery and High Performance Material Technology)
1991 – 1998
Member of the committee "Planning, capacity and organizational issues” of the Hochschulrektorenkonferenz (Conference of University Rectors) of Germany
1997 – 2003
Member of the faculty board of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering and Science of the TU Dresden
2000 – 2005
Reviewer for the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft – DFG (German Research Foundation)
since 2005
Scientific adviser and adviser for the transfer of technology, in particular for the Collaborative Research Centre 528 of the DFG
since 2005
Retirement
2000 – 2009
Chairman of the TUDAG, Technische Universität Dresden AG
since 2007
Scientific adviser for the Deutsches Zentrum Textilbeton – DZT (German Center for Textile-Reinforced Concrete) at the TUDAG
since 2009
Organisator of the Anwendertagung Textilbeton
since 2009
Initiator and chairman of the board of management of the association and quality label TUDALIT e. V.

Further functionings (abridged version)

Expert for the academic council for the Arbeitsgemeinschaft industrieller Forschungsvereinigungen „Otto von Guericke“ e.V. – AiF (German Federation of Industrial Research Associations) Full member of the Saxon Academy of Sciences in Leipzig Member of the National Academy of Science and Engineering acatech Member of the university council at Hof University from 1995 to 2015 Committee member of several well-known international textile conferences Member of the Sächsisches Textilforschungsinstitut Chemnitz e. V., (Saxon Textile Research Institute Chemnitz), Technical University of Chemnitz (TU Chemnitz) Member of the Int. Federation of Knitting Technology (IFKT) Honory Citizen of Buda Tech, Technical University of Budapest Scientific advisory board for the journal Melliand-Textilberichte (Melliand-textile reports), Melliand-International and Melliand-China

Honors

Between 1990 and 2005 more than 20 prizes have been awarded to outstanding student research projects, dissertations and scientific projects which have been supervised by the ITB (later known as ITM):
2000
Honoray doctorate of the State University for Technology, St. Petersburg, Russia
2001
Techtextil-Innovation Award
2003
Techtextil-Innovation Award
2004
Creativity Award of the Walter Reiners-Stiftung des Deutschen Textilmaschinenbaus for dissertations
2004
Creativity Award of the Walter Reiners-Stiftung des Deutschen Textilmaschinenbaus for Projects works and master theses
2005
Cetex-Sponsorship Award
2006
Honorary doctorate of the Technical University of Lodz, Poland
2013
AUTEX-Award 2013 (Association of Universities for Textiles)

Contact

Team-Sprecher

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Manfred Curbach
Institut für Massivbau
Technische Universität Dresden
01062 Dresden
Phone: + 49 (0) 351 / 46 33 76 60
E-Mail: manfred.curbach@tu-dresden.de

Pressekontakt

Sandra Kranich
Institut für Massivbau
Fakultät Bauingenieurwesen
Technische Universität Dresden
01062 Dresden
Phone: +49 (0) 351 / 48 45 67 17
Fax: +49 (0) 351 / 48 45 67 10
Mobile: +49 (0) 162 / 43 63 855
E-Mail: Sandra.Kranich@tu-dresden.de
www.massivbau.tu-dresden.de

C3 - Carbon Concrete Composite e.V.
World Trade Center Dresden
Ammonstraße 72
01067 Dresden
E-Mail: post@bauen-neu-denken.de
www.bauen-neu-denken.de

Status 2016

A description provided by the institutes and companies regarding their nominated projects

Concrete gives shape to the world we live in. The steel bars embedded in the concrete up to now reinforce the material and give it stability. Steel reinforced concrete is resource intensive, environmentally stressing, heavy and, moreover, susceptible to corrosion. In fact, we are faced with the consequences of corrosion damage, including deteriorated bridges and roads, every day. The thought of not being stuck in traffic jams anymore seems tempting, but unrealistic. However, if Manfred Curbach, Chokri Cherif and Peter Offermann had their way, all of the above could be changed soon. The three scientists hope to be able to replace approximately 20% of steel reinforced concrete with carbon concrete in the near future. But what exactly is carbon concrete, and what makes it so special? The innovative material is a composite made of high-performance concrete and carbon reinforcement. The revolution is in the carbon fibre, which produce a light, flexible and durable material. Each yarn is composed of up to fifty thousand of these extremely fine carbon fibres. A textile machine then processes the yarns into a fabric covered with a stabilising coating. Moreover, for an optimal load-efficiency in the concrete the fibres can be arranged according to the stress distribution. The result is a corrosion-resistant and resource-efficient alternative to steel reinforced concrete.

The Dresden scientists have been working on this fascinating material since the 1990s. The fundamental knowledge about carbon concrete is based on research about textile reinforced concrete, carried out between 1999 and 2011 in two collaborative research centres of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft DFG in Dresden and Aachen. The scientific knowledge gained by this research was gradually put into practice. The founding of the organisations Deutsches Zentrum Textilbeton, Tudalit e.V., TUDATEX GmbH and CarboCon GmbH is yet another result of their hard work. Along the process chain – from the basic material to the finished building component – the practical implementation process already began and is being continued since 2014 by the largest German construction research project "C³ - Carbon Concrete Composite". This project, financed by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research, is managed by Professor Manfred Curbach and, under the lead management of the Technische Universität Dresden, is making significant advances in the research of carbon concrete. More than 140 companies are currently working together in order to successfully bring the material on the market.

Carbon concrete is light, corrosion-resistant and flexible. Therefore, any field in need of resource and energy efficient, durable, space-saving and multifunctional construction methods is a potential market.

Carbon concrete can be utilised in two areas: structure maintenance (tunnels, bridges, residential and industrial buildings, concrete masts) and new constructions; in short, in all fields, where the main focus lies on reducing the mass of construction components, and hence the structure's dead load. For façade panels or balcony floor boards for instance, the costs for material, transport and fitting, as well as the substructure, fastening and support structure, can be drastically reduced. Due to lightweight building components the level of factory prefabrication can be increased, resulting in lower costs and higher quality.

Numerous strengthened buildings and new constructions demonstrate the practicality and high resource-efficiency of carbon concrete in an impressive and convincing manner.

Economical: Carbon concrete reduces costs and saves material
Building with carbon reinforced concrete creates new values. New structures with a significantly extended utilisation period are proof of this. At the same time, carbon concrete sustains existing values by the chance of reinforcing old buildings with very thin layers of concrete, enabling their continued use for a prolonged period of time. Carbon concrete not only saves valuable resources, but also allows us to reduce the total cost of construction. During the tender process for the strengthening of the historical railway bridge in Naila at the beginning of 2016, carbon concrete was chosen over steel reinforced concrete because it was 10% cheaper. Moreover, using carbon concrete for the structural retrofitting saved approximately 80% of the material.

The important thing is that as far as the technical efficiency is concerned, carbon and steel are equal in terms of price, although the kilogramme-prices may give a different impression. 1 kilogramme of steel costs appr. 1 euro, whereas a kilogramme of carbon costs appr.16 euros, respectively. However, the density of carbon is four times lower than that of steel, and its strength is six times as high. Consequently, for 16 times the price you get 24 times the technical efficiency.

For instance, façade panels or reinforcement layers made of carbon concrete are approximately only two centimetres thick, whereas if made of steel reinforced concrete, they would be eight centimetres thick. As such, the amount of material that has to be manufactured, transported, built in and fixed is reduced by 75%. Moreover, the significantly longer period of use plays an important role: whilst structures made of steel reinforced concrete have to be retrofitted every 40 to 80 years due to corrosion damage, carbon concrete is considered to have a service life of up to 200 years or more.

Efficient: Using carbon concrete reduces CO2 emissions and saves valuable resources
The building industry is one of the most important branches of the German economy. Its level of innovation will have a significant influence on whether Germany succeeds in fulfilling its climate goals - the reduction of CO2 emissions, energy saving and resource conservation. With the exception of water, concrete is the most-used raw material, with approximately 5 billion m³. Concrete is composed of cement, sand, gravel and water. 1.6 billion tonnes of cement, 10 billion tonnes of sand and gravel aggregate, and one billion tonnes of water are used in the development and retrofitting of buildings and bridges every year. Thereby, every tonne of cement generates over half a million tonnes of CO2. The immense amount of material required causes the building industry to be one of the largest emitters of CO2 and responsible for around 40% of energy consumption.

Carbon is a fundamental element of life on earth, and can be extracted from plants, rocks, and even air. Crude oil is currently used to produce carbon, as it is relatively inexpensive and, compared to the required amount, its availability is practically unlimited. However, current research is looking at the possibility of producing carbon from lignins, a product of wood residues left over when manufacturing paper. This method could be put into industrial use within 5 years.

Switching to carbon concrete for the construction and retrofitting of buildings reduces energy consumption and CO2 emissions by 50% and saves valuable resources. Using carbon concrete means we can build with thinner walls, which requires less cement, sand, gravel and water, and furthermore reduces transport costs.

Attractive: Carbon concrete creates an entirely new design language
A durable and resource-efficient composite material, carbon concrete combines strength with flexibility and multi-functionality, making construction maintenance and future construction economical, ecologically sustainable and attractive. "Lightweight building" and "concrete" is no longer a contradiction. The relatively small thickness of the building components allows for a finer and more appealing building style. Thus, it is possible to gain more interior space whilst maintaining the size of the exterior. The flexible but extremely highstrength carbon fabric is easy to process and, due to its enhanced durability, is a suitable as reinforcing material.

Carbon concrete causes a paradigm shift in architecture as well as construction, and is about to create an entirely new design language. In future carbon concrete technology is likely to meet changing user requirements and to adjust to new multifunctional features. Furthermore, carbon concrete creates new opportunities for building retrofitting and strengthening. The innovative building material allows for extremely thin but highly efficient strengthening layers in concrete constructions and is particularly suited to complex boundary conditions and the preservation of historical buildings.

TU Dresden / Institute for Concrete Construction & Institute for Textile Machinery and High Performance Material Technology
With 36,000 students, the Technische Universität Dresden is one of the leading universities in Germany and Europe; strong in the field of research, first-class in diversity and the quality of educational programmes, and closely linked to culture, commerce and society.

Concrete construction has been taught as part of the TU Dresden programme for more than 100 years. The institute includes two professorships. The academic focus in teaching and research lies on all aspects of reinforced concrete in experiments and simulations. Several commercial and industrial partners add to the programme and work together to transfer the results of research to real construction projects.

The research activity of the Institute for Textile Machinery and High Performance Material Technology includes the processing of fibre-based high tech materials with various processing technologies, as well as the functionally integrated development of semi-finished textiles and textile products. In addition, the research activity includes the modelling and simulation of structures and processes at every stage of the textile chain.

The interdisciplinary project “C³ - Carbon Concrete Composite” is one of ten projects funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research programme "Twenty20 - Partnership for Innovation" as part of the initiative "Entrepreneurial Regions". The project is managed by the Technische Universität Dresden. The C³ project is working with over 140 partners from research in addition to various companies and associations to develop a new composite material made of carbon fibres and high performance concrete. Thanks to its flexibility and durability, carbon concrete is a resource-efficient alternative to steel reinforced concrete and saves material as well as creating many new design opportunities, characterised by lightness and malleability.

The right to nominate outstanding achievements for the Deutscher Zukunftspreis is incumbent on leading German institutions in science and industry as well as foundations.

The project "Carbon concrete, a fascinating material - economical, efficient, attractive” was nominated by the Leopoldina - the German National Academy of Sciences.